MIR, In The Dust Of This Planet End of the Alphabet Records, 2015

Photo Credit Noel Meek

Photo Credit Noel Meek

 Xeno-electronic emissions woven from a blackened blend of technoid deconstructions, harsh noise, post-industrial electronics, and dark alien dronescapes. MIR is Richard B. Keys (analogue synthesis and drum programming), Pedro Torres (granular synthesis/sampling), Beth Hilton (projection/ visual materials).


"Desolation is more than one man can explain. It is experienced differently from person to person; where one would place it as a sole being in an area of complete emptiness and seclusion, another may find desolation in the form of the crumbling infrastructure abused in urban landscapes. Does it speak to isolation or deterioration? Is it felt more as an organic happening or a synthesized event? In the Dust of This Planet asks all these questions in its fearless/fearsome drones. Combining the various stages of drone from the past 30 years (a dash of industrial, a pinch of electronica, a lot of minimalism), MIR set the stage for desolate listening. Though the air is disturbed and the scene is well lit, how you make out the surroundings is up to you. What you will notice is how cold In the Dust of This Planet comes across, really letting you feel the crumbling world which we are killing through our irresponsibility. So yeah, another one of THOSE records. Maybe with the not-so subtle hand of MIR, this time you’ll pay attention." - J Spicer @ Tiny Mix Tapes

"I’m somewhat obsessed with MIR’s In the Dust of this Planet, and it’s my favourite release from End of the Alphabet Records’ roster so far. Admittedly, I am a dark ambient nerd, so I’m predisposed to liking it already. But I think obsessing about the album is really the only appropriate response you can have. It’s so imbued with mystery, so framed by its bleak aura, and so utterly fathomless […] Much like the works of fellow multimedia artist Thomas Köner, MIR have ensured that In Dust of this Planet perfectly reflects the environment in which it was created. In this case, it was “the darkest reaches of the south of New Zealand”. And there is an aptly isolated and solitary feel to all of the tracks. Additionally, there’s a sense of almost post-human barrenness that links to that isolation. A sense that MIR’s drones are framing the memories, or perhaps marking the presence, of a society now reduced to ruin. There’s a haunting and entrancing fragility to In Dust of this Planet, where the sounds therein are at their most diaphanous, and flashes of light peek through the clouds overhead. However, what possesses me so utterly are the shadowy and desolate chasms that the light exposes, and how the album then explores those depths." - Craig Hayes @ Six Noises